April192014
wildcat2030:

How Do Sperm Recognize Eggs? Mechanism Finally Found - It’s the stuff of 3rd-grade sex ed: sperm meets egg to make baby. But, surprisingly, scientists have actually been in the dark about one crucial step: how the two sex cells recognize each other amidst the fluid frenzy in the Fallopian tubes. Now researchers have announced that they’ve found the missing piece of this fertilization puzzle, and that the discovery could lead to individualized fertility treatments and hormone-free birth control. Back in 2005, researchers found the first half of the the puzzle: a binding protein on the surface of sperm they called Izumol (after a Japanese marriage shrine). In the decade since then, scientists have been searching for Izumol’s counterpart on egg cells. Essentially, they’d found the plug but couldn’t locate the outlet. Today researchers at Cambridge announced they’ve found that outlet: a receptor protein on the surface of the egg cell. They’ve found it on the eggs of pigs, opossums, mice and even humans. (via How Do Sperm Recognize Eggs? Mechanism Finally Found - D-brief | DiscoverMagazine.com)

wildcat2030:

How Do Sperm Recognize Eggs? Mechanism Finally Found
-
It’s the stuff of 3rd-grade sex ed: sperm meets egg to make baby. But, surprisingly, scientists have actually been in the dark about one crucial step: how the two sex cells recognize each other amidst the fluid frenzy in the Fallopian tubes. Now researchers have announced that they’ve found the missing piece of this fertilization puzzle, and that the discovery could lead to individualized fertility treatments and hormone-free birth control. Back in 2005, researchers found the first half of the the puzzle: a binding protein on the surface of sperm they called Izumol (after a Japanese marriage shrine). In the decade since then, scientists have been searching for Izumol’s counterpart on egg cells. Essentially, they’d found the plug but couldn’t locate the outlet. Today researchers at Cambridge announced they’ve found that outlet: a receptor protein on the surface of the egg cell. They’ve found it on the eggs of pigs, opossums, mice and even humans. (via How Do Sperm Recognize Eggs? Mechanism Finally Found - D-brief | DiscoverMagazine.com)

(via insidious-effects-of-life)

5PM

archiemcphee:

Norway has just emerged as a challenger for Japan’s title as Masters of Awesome Cuteness. These photos were taken on the set of “Piip-Show”, a live reality tv show following the lives of a cast comprised of wild birds and the occasional squirrel. Conceived by Norwegian freelance photographer Magne Klann, the show takes place on a set which is an outdoor bird feeder modeled after Java, a well-known coffee shop in Oslo, Norway.

“Different personalities meet inside the bar. Among others a short tempered nuthatch, a blue tit with the memory of a gold fish, a happy-go-lucky great tit, and a depressed bullfinch. Like in any other bar there is bickering, petty theft, fighting and attempts at romance”.

We can’t help but try to pair these animals with various cast members from Seinfeld.

Billed as the very first reality show for birds, the “Piip-Show" is a three-month-long project that’s being broadcast live on the Norwegian broadcasting network NRK.

Click here to watch the “Piip-Show” online

[via Junkculture]

(via blackyote)

5PM
8AM

thejunglenook:

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

"Humans aren’t broken. They’re never broken. The technology we provide for rehabilitation is broken."

8AM

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit

Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.

Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.

Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

(via thejunglenook)

6AM

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

guceubcuesu:

hey

image

Watchu got there

image

a skull that connects to my spine hbu

(via blackyote)

April182014
4PM

how to pick up CHICKS!!

hyacynthus:

eggeworth:

  • cup your hands around them protectively
  • lift them from the ground
  • gently kiss their fuzzy heads
  • say “peep peep” calmingly so as not to be pecked
  • peep peep

Don’t forget:

  • vomit partially digested worms/slugs/insects into their freakishly patterned mouthsimage

(Source: targents)

4PM
1PM

scientific-women:

kindaoffkilter:

Neil Degrasse Tyson fields an audience question asking if there is a genetic component to why significantly fewer women are in science by bringing his own experience as a black man attempting to succeed in a white male dominated field. 

He knocks it out of the park. 

Thank you Neil!

ETA: The bit of interest is at 1:01:30, but the whole forum is very good.

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